32 of the Best Ways to Get Organized When You Have ADHD

32 of the Best Ways to Get Organized When You Have ADHD

By Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S.

Organization is a common challenge for adults with ADHD. But it can be done! Below, ADHD specialists share their foolproof tips for cutting out clutter, managing time, creating an efficient space and more. Remember that the key to organization is having a simple system that works for you and your family. So experiment with these tips, keep what you like and toss the rest.

1. Use a planner.

People often underestimate the power of a simple planner. “An effective, consistent planning system is the number one strategy to better organize, prioritize and manage time,” according to Laurie Dupar, a certified ADHD coach, nurse practitioner and editor and co-author of 365 Ways to Succeed with ADHD, a full year of bite-sized strategies to help you thrive with ADHD.

Psychotherapist Terry Matlen, ACSW, who has ADHD, uses a teacher’s style spiral “at a glance” calendar with large boxes. And it goes everywhere she does.

2. Use eye-catching materials.

“Copy a schedule of your weekly planner on an obnoxiously bright colored piece of paper [so it stands out] at the beginning of the week,” Dupar said. Cross off what you’ve done and add Post-It notes for tasks that come up.

3. Keep tasks straight with spiral notebooks.

As a therapist, consultant, director of www.ADDconsults.com and www.MomsWithADD.com and a mom, Matlen has a lot going on every day. So she devotes one spiral notebook to each of these areas.

For instance, she has one notebook for her daughter’s medication and another for phone notes with her webmaster. Matlen keeps each spiral notebook with related paperwork in a file folder with a matching color. If she uses a notebook regularly, she keeps it on a wall organizer for quick access.

4. Have a “brain dump.”

That’s how Matlen describes one of her notebooks. Here, Matlen records any notes, phone calls or other plans, and dates each page. Her latest page features the foods she’s ordering for the holidays along with her winter travel plans, which include detailed flight information.

5. Bank online.

Put a stop to paper statements, so you have less paperwork to manage. Use direct deposit and automatic withdrawal, said Stephanie Sarkis, Ph.D, psychotherapist and author of four books, including 10 Simple Solutions to Adult ADD: How to Overcome Chronic Distraction & Accomplish Your Goals. She also suggested using money management software, such as Quicken, and getting a receipt scanner so you can throw away paper receipts.

6. Forget your appointment time.

Instead of focusing on when your appointment actually is, plan around the time you’re leaving. If Matlen has a 2 p.m. appointment, she knows that she needs to be out the door by 1:45. This way you don’t think you have more time than you really do.

7. Sort items using a five-box method.

Sarkis suggested having five boxes with the labels: “Keep, Toss, Give away, Donate and Trash.” When figuring out whether to keep or toss an item, avoid asking yourself if an item has any value or if you’ll need it some time, said Ari Tuckman, PsyD, a psychologist and author of the new workbook Understand Your Brain, Get More Done. (The answer will probably be yes.) Instead, he suggested asking: “Does this item have enough value? Will this get in the way of finding more important items?” As he added: “These questions yield very different answers.”

8. Purge excess possessions — ruthlessly.

The more stuff you have, the harder it is to get and stay organized, because there’s less space and more laundry, more dishes and more to clean. As Tuckman said, “At some point, it becomes impossible [to organize] — you can’t organize 10 gallons of water into a 5-gallon bucket.”

That’s why Susan C. Pinsky, owner of Organizationally Yours in Acton, MA, and author of Organizational Solutions for People with Attention Deficit Disorder, takes a radical approach with her clients and helps them purge most of their possessions. She believes that good organization for adults with ADHD is all about efficiency with the least number of steps and effort. And managing less will always be less work, she said.

Pinsky asks clients to pick one or two indulgences, such as books, shoes or music, and pare down the rest. For instance, do you really need a cabinet filled with Tupperware? With a little resourcefulness four to six pieces are plenty, Pinsky said. And you’ll find the same with dishes, knick-knacks, shoes, documents and other items.

9. Get creative with visual reminders.

“When my daughter’s meds are running low, I turn the bottles upside down in the cabinet as a reminder that I need to call in soon for refills,” Matlen said.

10. Enlist an organization buddy.

This can be anyone from a friend to a family member to a coach to a professional organizer, Sarkis said. To avoid burnout, work for 30 minutes, take a 15-minute break and then repeat, she added.

11. Cut out company logos for your file folders.

ADHD coach Sandy Maynard’s clients really like this tip because it helps them categorize their bills quickly and easily. This is what it looks like.

12. Sort mail over a wastebasket.

This makes it all the more convenient to trash what you don’t need without moving papers or going to another space. Maynard also believes in using the O.H.I.O. principle when sorting mail: “Only Handle It Once!”

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The 12 Common Archetypes

The term “archetype” has its origins in ancient Greek. The root words are archein, which means “original or old”; and typos, which means “pattern, model or type”. The combined meaning is an “original pattern” of which all other similar persons, objects, or concepts are derived, copied, modeled, or emulated.
The psychologist, Carl Gustav Jung, used the concept of archetype in his theory of the human psyche. He believed that universal, mythic characters—archetypes—reside within the collective unconscious of people the world over. Archetypes represent fundamental human motifs of our experience as we evolved; consequentially, they evoke deep emotions.
Although there are many different archetypes, Jung defined twelve primary types that symbolize basic human motivations. Each type has its own set of values, meanings and personality traits. Also, the twelve types are divided into three sets of four, namely Ego, Soul and Self. The types in each set share a common driving source, for example types within the Ego set are driven to fulfill ego-defined agendas.
Most, if not all, people have several archetypes at play in their personality construct; however, one archetype tends to dominate the personality in general. It can be helpful to know which archetypes are at play in oneself and others, especially loved ones, friends and co-workers, in order to gain personal insight into behaviors and motivations.

The Ego Types

1. The Innocent Motto: Free to be you and me Core desire: to get to paradise Goal: to be happy Greatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrong Strategy: to do things right Weakness: boring for all their naive innocence Talent: faith and optimism The Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer.

2. The Orphan/Regular Guy or Gal Motto: All men and women are created equal Core Desire: connecting with others Goal: to belong Greatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowd Strategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touch Weakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationships Talent: realism, empathy, lack of pretense The Regular Person is also known as: The good old boy, everyman, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbor, the silent majority.

3. The Hero Motto: Where there’s a will, there’s a way Core desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous acts Goal: expert mastery in a way that improves the world Greatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken” Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possible Weakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fight Talent: competence and courage The Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player.

4. The Caregiver Motto: Love your neighbour as yourself Core desire: to protect and care for others Goal: to help others Greatest fear: selfishness and ingratitude Strategy: doing things for others Weakness: martyrdom and being exploited Talent: compassion, generosity The Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter.

The Soul Types

5. The Explorer Motto: Don’t fence me in Core desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world Goal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life Biggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptiness Strategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredom Weakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfit Talent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soul The explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim.

6. The Rebel Motto: Rules are made to be broken Core desire: revenge or revolution Goal: to overturn what isn’t working Greatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectual Strategy: disrupt, destroy, or shock Weakness: crossing over to the dark side, crime Talent: outrageousness, radical freedom The Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast.

7. The Lover Motto: You’re the only one Core desire: intimacy and experience Goal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they love Greatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unloved Strategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractive Weakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identity Talent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitment The Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder.

8. The Creator Motto: If you can imagine it, it can be done Core desire: to create things of enduring value Goal: to realize a vision Greatest fear: mediocre vision or execution Strategy: develop artistic control and skill Task: to create culture, express own vision Weakness: perfectionism, bad solutions Talent: creativity and imagination The Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer.

The Self Types

9. The Jester Motto: You only live once Core desire: to live in the moment with full enjoyment Goal: to have a great time and lighten up the world Greatest fear: being bored or boring others Strategy: play, make jokes, be funny Weakness: frivolity, wasting time Talent: joy The Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian.

10. The Sage Motto: The truth will set you free Core desire: to find the truth. Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world. Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance. Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes. Weakness: can study details forever and never act. Talent: wisdom, intelligence. The Sage is also known as: The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative.

11. The Magician Motto: I make things happen. Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universe Goal: to make dreams come true Greatest fear: unintended negative consequences Strategy: develop a vision and live by it Weakness: becoming manipulative Talent: finding win-win solutions The Magician is also known as:The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man.

12. The Ruler Motto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing. Core desire: control Goal: create a prosperous, successful family or community Strategy: exercise power Greatest fear: chaos, being overthrown Weakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegate Talent: responsibility, leadership The Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator.

The Four Cardinal Orientations

The Four Cardinal Orientations define four groups, with each group containing three types (as the wheel of archetypes shown above illustrates). Each group is motivated by its respective orienting focus: ego-fulfillment, freedom, socialness and order. This is a variation on the three groups of Types previously mentioned; however, whereas all the types within the Ego, Soul & Self sets all share the same driving source, the types comprising the four orienting groups have different source drives but the same motivating orientation. For example, the Caregiver is driven by the need to fulfill ego agendas through meeting the needs of others, which is a social orientation; whereas, the Hero, which is also driven by the need to fulfill ego agendas, does so through courageous action that proves self-worth. Understanding the groupings will aid in understanding the motivational and self-perceptual dynamics of each type.

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David Hawkins Essence

Spirit refers to an unseen essence, which never changes, even though its expression varies from one situation to another. This essence is vital; when we lose our spirit, we die – we expire from lack of that which inspires. Power vs. Force. The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior, chapter 13, S. 179, Hay House edition, February 2002

(↓)Contrasting pairs of emotions, attitudes, and feeling states
  • Positive (Strong) Response – Negative (Weak) Response
    1. Inspire – Discourage
    2. Forgive – Condemn
    3. Support – Ignore
    4. Love – Hate
    5. Unconditional Love – Selective Love
    6. Optimism – Pessimism
    7. Faith – Cynicism
    8. Trust – Doubt
    9. Unify – Divide
    10. Humor – Vilify
    11. Respect – Demean
    12. Patient – Impatient
    13. Steadfast – Faltering
    14. Win-Win – Win-Lose
    15. Peace Maker – Trouble Maker
    16. Flexible – Rigid
    17. Balanced – Extremist
    18. Open – Deceptive
    19. Truthful – False
    20. Appreciate – Envy
    21. Taking responsibility – Blaming
    22. Defends – Attacks
    23. Constructive – Destructive
    24. Independent – Dependent
    25. Humility – Prideful
    26. Gracious – Arrogant
    27. Equality – Snobbery/superiority
    28. Compassion – Condemnation / Judgment
    29. Acceptance – Rejection
    30. Generous – Greedy, stingy
    31. Abundance – Lack
    32. Sobriety – Intoxication
    33. Self-forgiveness – Guilt
    34. Tolerant – Prejudiced
    35. Team Spirit – Personal ambition
    36. Concern for others – Self-concern
    37. Surrender – Worry, control, dominate
    38. Supports, respects freedom of others – Controls others
    39. Accepts a Higher Power – Rejects a Higher Power
    40. Approving – Critical
    41. Understanding – Fault finding
    42. Forgiving – Judgmental
    43. Leaves judgments to God – Makes personal judgments
    44. Kind – Cruel
    45. Long-term goal – Short-sighted
    46. Cherish – Demean
    47. Unselfish – Selfish
    48. Service to Others – Self-interest
    49. Share – Hoard
    50. Wealth – Riches
    51. Orderly – Confused
    52. Save – Punish-Execute
    53. Courage – Cowardice
    54. Nurture and give – Take and drain
    55. Merciful – Cruel
    56. Gentle, tender – Rough and hard
    57. Servant to all – Haughty and arrogant
    58. Chooses peace – Chooses conflict or war
    59. Trusts the Universe – Mistrustful
    60. Feels significant – Feels important
    61. Compliments – Criticizes
    62. Candid, warm – Cold, unfriendly
    63. Non-attached – Detached, indifferent
    64. Involved – Separated, removed
    65. Thoughtful – Opinionated
    66. Spiritual – Materialistic
    67. Powerful – Forceful
      68 Tolerant of differences –intolerant of others
      69 Intuitive –Literal
      70 Lives by principle –Lives by expediency
      71 Civil, polite –Hostile and rude
      72 Sensitive to beauty – Ignores aesthetics
      73 Classical music – Punk Rock
      74 Erotic, passionate, ardent – Lustful
      75 Seeks joy – Seeks pleasure
      76 Willing to sacrifice self –Sacrifice others for  happiness pleasure, fun, thrills
      77 Peace –Excitement
      78 Self-Control –Impulsive
      79 Self-awareness –Denial
      80 Takes own inventory –Takes inventory of  others
      81 Cooperative –Competitive
      82 Sense of humor –”Heavy”
      83 Lighthearted –Literal-humorless
      84 Loving –Possessive
      85 Seeks to heal Others –”deserve what  they get”
      86 Considerate –Inconsiderate
      87 Prefers education – Prefers crime dramas  and documentaries and horror films
      88 Views human nature as good – Sees human nature as  bad
      89 Open minded –Intolerant and narrow  minded
      90 Wide visual field –Narrow visual  perception
      91 Focuses on far side –Focuses near side  of objects of objects
      92 Inclusive – Exclusive
      93 Interested in the Timeless – Faddish
      94 Interested in Essence –Attracted by  appearance
      95 Quality – Glamour
      96 Integrity – Expediency
      97 Principled –Immoral
      98 Energized by meaning – Driven by desire  and purpose
      99 Gentle with authority – Overbearing
      100 Seeks to subdue, control,– Seeks to subdue, and conquer self control, conquer  others  101 Accepts responsibility – Blames others or for mistakes condemns self for failures  Power vs. Force. The Hidden Determinants of Human Behavior, chapter 9, S. 146-147, Hay House edition, February 2002
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On Being Nobody

by Bill Walz

In Zen, there is a concept utterly foreign to the American mind.  This concept is an ideal; a goal of Zen practice; and it is, paradoxical for an ambition, to be “nobody.”  In Japanese, this concept is communicated with the word, ”mushin,” or, in Chinese, “Mu,” which translates as “no-mind.”  No-mind means to be without ego, to stand in the world as a phenomenon no more important than a bird or a flower, yet equally, no less important than the galaxies themselves.  It means, in the lexicon of Zen, “emptiness.”

The way of the no-mind person is the way of living as “nobody.”  Not a nobody, for this implies you ought to be somebody special, but are not.  To be nobody is a conscious and positive stance in the world, not a lack or failure of stance.  It is about living as a being of and within Nature, not outside it.  It is in understanding that to live from ego, as if the structures of ego are who you are, is the “fall from grace,” the “original sin,” the loss of your true harmonious self.  To be nobody is to live from the natural and spontaneous source of your own being, using your intelligence and faculties to be skillfully in rather than above or attempting to control life.

With no-mind, blossoms invite the butterfly;
With no-mind, the butterfly visits the blossoms.
When the flower blooms, the butterfly comes;
When the butterfly comes, the flower blooms.
I do not “know” others;
Others do not “know” me.
Not-knowing each other we naturally follow the Way.

18th Century Japanese poet, Ryokan

The “Way” that is being referred to is the ancient Chinese Taoist Way, the Way that Lao Tzu, described in the Tao Te Ching as the “origin of heaven-and-earth, it is nameless.”  It is the way beyond intellectualization, categorization and judgment.  It is the way of Nature, not of the egoic human mind.  The “not-knowing” that Ryokan is referring to, is not having preconceived ideas about others and about life, rather, allowing each encounter to be fresh, completely and naturally what it is.

Without a preconceived identity and without preconceived ideas about life, self and others, I am, in this sense, nobody experiencing with no-mind.  Anxiety, anger, depression, arrogance and selfishness are so clearly harmful and unnecessary to a person who is, in consciousness, “nobody.” The joy of living in Creation, harmonious within and without, is their natural abode.

“The adept in Zen is one who manages to be human with the same artless grace and absence of inner conflict with which a tree is a tree.” – Alan Watts

In the modern world, where we are over-burdened with the weight of our own insecure identity, with the obsessive and desperate need for significance, to be “somebody,” to contemplate the meaning of “nobody” can be a valuable reference point.  It reminds us that we have fallen into a terrible hubris, into an arrogance that places us quite outside and at opposition with Nature, and with what Buddhists would call our own original nature.  We have become quite caught in our egoic self-centeredness, our ambitions, opinions and judgments; afraid of being a nobody.  We take everything personally and are filled with inner conflict. This is a most uncomfortable and graceless place to live.

After all, what is it that we get so upset about?  Usually it is about not having things go the way we want them to, or feeling injured, slighted, insulted or discounted in some way.  Being upset is usually about the ego-self wanting more control and importance than it has.  This can be true over real injury, certainly, or, as is often the case, in just not getting our way the way we want it.  The modern spiritual teacher, Eckhart Tolle, describes our emotional distress as the result of being resistant to what is.  What a simple and clear teaching.  So too then, when we don’t find our identity in ego, we can face many threats and losses, real and imagined, even death, and remain calm and accepting.  We take nothing personally.  Few bits-of-advice can be given that contain greater wisdom.

It is important to realize – this is not about being passive.  Activity and creativity are in our nature and to be active and creative in the expression of life are appropriate and harmonious.  In the service of ego, however, action is seldom harmonious.  Certainly, there are times to resist cruelty and stupidity, but it does not have to be from a place of fear, anger, or violent emotion.  It is just the necessary thing to do.  In the parlance of Zen it is then ‘”non-doing”.   Certainly there are times to use effort for the benefit of our person, others and human society.  Our choice is whether the effort is ego-directed, or from the place of just doing what needs to be done.   Non-doing follows our deepest natural imperative, and “betterment” means to become more conscious, alive, and balanced with others, society and Nature within and around us.

As we assert ourselves, face a challenge, respond to injury or disappointment, whether it is slight or great, we can let go of our ego, be nobody, and in so doing, become more in harmony with life as it is, and with our own life as it is meant to be.  We can engage a moment that could have been one of struggle and suffering for others and ourselves, and instead, turn it into a moment of mastery.  We can be masterfully active and creative just because it is in our nature to be so, noting that to “nobody,” mastery is no big deal.  No big deal, but oh, how splendid.  Like the stars in the night sky or the butterfly visiting the blossom, like a tree being a tree, we can be naturally human, as is said in Zen, “Just so.”

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There is pleasure, and there is bliss. Forgo the first to possess the second

THERE IS PLEASURE
AND THERE IS BLISS.
FORGO THE FIRST TO POSSESS THE SECOND.

Osho – Meditate over it as deeply as possible, because it contains one of the most fundamental truths. These four words will have to be understood, pondered over. The first is pleasure, the second, happiness; the third is joy, and the fourth is bliss.

Pleasure is physical, physiological. Pleasure is the most superficial thing in life; it is titillation. It can be sexual, it can be of other senses, it can become an obsession with food, but it is rooted in the body. The body is your periphery, your circumference; it is not your center. And to live on the circumference is to live on the mercy of all kinds of things that go on happening around you. The man who seeks pleasure remains at the mercy of accidents.
It is like the waves in the ocean; they are at the mercy of the winds. When strong winds come, they are there; when winds disappear, they disappear. They don’t have an independent existence; they are dependent, and anything that is dependent on the other brings bondage.

Pleasure is dependent on the other. If you love a woman, if that is your pleasure, then that woman becomes your master. If you love a man, if that is your pleasure and you feel unhappy, in despair, sad, without him, then you have created a bondage for yourself. You have created a prison, you are no more in freedom.

If you are a seeker after money and power, then you will be dependent on money and power. The man who goes on accumulating money, if it is his pleasure to have more and more money, will become more and more miserable — because the more he has, the more he wants, and the more he has, the more he is afraid to lose it. A double-edged sword: the more he wants… the first edge of the sword. Hence he becomes more and more miserable.
The more you demand, desire, the more you feel yourself lacking something, the more hollow, empty, you appear to yourself. On the other hand — the other edge of the sword — is that the more you have, the more you are afraid it can be taken away; it can be stolen. The bank can go bankrupt, the political situation in the country can change, the country can go communist. There are a thousand and one things upon which your money depends. Your money does not make you a master, it makes you a slave. Pleasure is peripheral; hence it is bound to depend on the outer circumstances. And it is only titillation.

If food is pleasure, what actually is being enjoyed? — just the taste! For a moment, when the food passes your taste buds on the tongue, you feel a sensation which you interpret as pleasure. It is your interpretation. Today it may look like pleasure and tomorrow it may not look like pleasure. If you go on eating the same food every day your buds on the tongue will become nonresponsive to it. Soon you will be fed up with it — that’s how people become fed up.

One day you are running after a man or a woman and the next day you are trying to find an excuse to get rid of the other. The same person, nothing has changed! What has happened meanwhile? You are bored with the other, because the whole pleasure was in knowing the new. Now the other is no longer new; you are acquainted with the territory of the other. You are acquainted with the body of the other, the curves of the body, the feel of the body. Now the mind is hankering for something new. The mind is always hankering for something new. That’s how mind keeps you always tethered somewhere in the future. It keeps you hoping, but it never delivers the goods — it cannot. It can only create new hopes, new desires.

Just as leaves grow on the trees, desires and hopes grow in the mind. You wanted a new house and now you have it — and where is the pleasure? Just for the moment it was there, when you achieved your goal. Once you have achieved your goal, your mind is no longer interested in it; it has already started spinning new webs of desire. It has already started thinking of other, bigger houses. And this is so about everything.

Pleasure keeps you in a neurotic state, restless, always in turmoil. So many desires, and every desire unquenchable, clamoring for attention. You remain a victim of a crowd of insane desires — insane because they are unfulfillable — and they go on dragging you into different directions. You become a contradiction. One desire takes you to the left, another towards the right, and simultaneously you go on nourishing both the desires. And then you feel a split, then you feel divided, then you feel torn apart, then you feel like you are falling into pieces. Nobody is responsible. It is the whole stupidity of desiring pleasure that creates this.

And it is a complex phenomenon. You are not the only one who is seeking pleasure; millions of people just like you are seeking the same pleasures. Hence there is great struggle, competition, violence, war. All have become enemies to each other because they are all seeking the same goal, and they all can’t have it; hence the struggle has to be total. You have to risk all — for nothing, because when you gain, you gain nothing, and your whole life is wasted in this struggle. A life which might have been a celebration becomes a long, drawn out, unnecessary struggle.

When you are so much after pleasure you cannot love, because the man who seeks pleasure uses the other as a means. And to use the other as a means is one of the most immoral acts possible, because each being is an end unto himself, you cannot use the other as a means. But in pleasure-seeking you have to use the other as a means. You become cunning because it is such a struggle. If you are not cunning you will be deceived, and before others deceive you, you have to deceive them.

Machiavelli has advised pleasure-seekers that the best way of defense is to attack. Never wait for the other to attack you; that may be too late. Before the other attacks you, you attack him! That is the best way of defense. And this is being followed, whether you know Machiavelli or not.

This is something very strange: people know about Christ, about Buddha, about Mohammed, about Krishna; nobody follows them. People don’t know much about Chanakya and Machiavelli, but people follow them — as if Machiavelli and Chanakya are very close to your heart! You need not read them, you are already following them. Your whole society is based on Machiavellian principles; that’s what the whole political game is all about. Before somebody snatches anything from you, snatch it from the other. Be always on guard. Naturally, if you are always on guard you will be tense, anxious, worried. And the struggle IS such and it is constant. You are one, and the enemies are millions.

For example, if in India you want to become the prime minister, then millions of people, who also want to become the prime minister, are your enemies. And who does not want to become the prime minister? One may say, one may not say. So everyone is against

you and you are against everybody else. This small life of seventy, eighty years, will be wasted into some utterly futile effort. Pleasure is not and cannot be the goal of life. The second word to be understood is happiness. Happiness is psychological, pleasure is physiological. Happiness is a little better, a little more refined, a little higher, but not very much different from pleasure. You can say that pleasure is a lower kind of happiness and happiness is a little higher kind of pleasure — two sides of the same coin.

Pleasure is a little primitive, animal; happiness is a little more cultured, a little more human — but it is the same game played in the world of the mind. You are not so much concerned with physiological sensations; you are much more concerned with psychological sensations. But basically they are not different; hence Buddha has not talked about four words, he has talked about only two.

The third is joy; joy is spiritual. It is different, totally different from pleasure, happiness. It has nothing to do with the other; it is inner. It is not dependent on circumstances; it is your own. It is not a titillation produced by things; it is a state of peace, of silence, a meditative state. It is spiritual.

But Buddha has not talked about joy either, because there is still one thing that goes beyond joy. He calls it bliss. Bliss is total. It is neither physiological nor psychological nor spiritual. It knows no division, it is indivisible. It is total in one sense and transcendental in another sense. Buddha only talks about two words. The first is pleasure; it includes happiness. The second is bliss; it includes joy.

Bliss means you have reached to the very innermost core of your being. It belongs to the ultimate depth of your being where even the ego is no more, where only silence prevails; you have disappeared. In joy you are a little bit, but in bliss you are not. The ego has dissolved; it is a state of nonbeing. Buddha calls it nirvana. Nirvana means you have ceased to be; you are just an infinite emptiness like the sky. And the moment you are that infinity, you become full of the stars, and a totally new life begins. You are reborn.

Pleasure is momentary, of time, for the time being; bliss is nontemporal, timeless. Pleasure begins and ends; bliss abides forever. Pleasure comes and goes; bliss never comes, never goes — it is already there in the innermost core of your being. Pleasure has to be snatched away from the other; you become either a beggar or a thief. Bliss makes you a master. Bliss is not something that you invent but something that you discover. Bliss is your innermost nature. It has been there since the very beginning, you just have not looked at it, you have taken it for granted. You don’t look inwards. This is the only misery of man: that he goes on looking outwards, seeking and searching. And you cannot find it in the outside because it is not there.

One evening, Rabiya was searching for something on the street in front of her small hut. The sun was setting; slowly slowly darkness was descending. A few people gathered. They asked the old woman — she was a famous Sufi mystic — “What are you doing? What have you lost? What are you searching for?”
She said, “I have lost my needle.”

The people said, “Now the sun is setting and it will be very difficult to find the needle, but we will help you. Where exactly has it fallen? — because the road is big and the needle is so small. If we know the exact place it will be easier to find it.”
Rabiya said, “If you don’t ask me that question, that will be better — because in fact it has not fallen on the road at all! It has fallen inside my house.”
The people started laughing and they said, “We had always thought that you are a little insane! If the needle has fallen inside the house, then why are you searching on the road?”
Rabiya said, “For a simple, logical reason: inside the house there is no light and on the outside a little light is still there.”
The people laughed and started dispersing.

Rabiya called them and said, “Listen! That’s exactly what you are doing; I was just following your example. You go on seeking bliss in the outside world without asking the first and primary question: Where have you lost it? And I tell you, you have lost it inside. You are looking for it on the outside, for the simple, logical reason that your senses open outwards — there is a little more light. Your eyes look outwards, your ears hear outwards, your hands reach outwards; that’s the simple reason why you are searching there. Otherwise, I tell you, you have not lost it outside — and I tell you on my own authority. I have also searched on the outside for many, many lives, and the day I looked in I was surprised. There was no need to seek and search; it has always been there.”

Bliss is your innermost core. Pleasure you have to beg from others; naturally you become dependent. Bliss makes you a master. Bliss is not something that happens; it is already the case.

Buddha says: THERE IS PLEASURE AND THERE IS BLISS. FORGO THE FIRST TO POSSESS THE SECOND. Stop looking on the outside. Look within, turn in. Start seeking and searching in your own interiority, into your own subjectivity. Bliss is not an object to be found anywhere else; it is your consciousness.

In the East we have always defined the ultimate truth as SAT-CHIT-ANAND. SAT means truth, CHIT means consciousness, ANAND means bliss. They are all three faces of the same reality. This is the true trinity — not God the Father, and the Son, Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost; that is not the true trinity. The true trinity is truth, consciousness, bliss. And they are not separate phenomena, but one energy expressing in three ways, one energy having three faces. Hence in the East we say God is TRIMURTI — God has three faces. These are the real faces, not Brahma, Vishnu, Mahesh. Those are for the children — spiritually, metaphysically, for the immature. Brahma, Vishnu, Mahesh: those names are for the beginners.

Truth, consciousness, bliss — these are the ultimate truths. First comes truth; as you enter in, you become aware of your eternal reality: sat, truth. As you go deeper into your reality, into your sat, into your truth, you become aware of consciousness, a tremendous consciousness. All is light, nothing is dark. All is awareness, nothing is unawareness. You are just a flame of consciousness, not even a shadow of unconsciousness anywhere. And when you enter still deeper, then the ultimate core is bliss — anand.

Buddha says: Forgo everything that you have thought up to now meaningful, significant. Sacrifice everything for this ultimate because this is the only thing that will make you contented, that will make you fulfilled, that will bring spring to your being… and you will blossom into a thousand and one flowers.

Pleasure will keep you a driftwood. Pleasure will make you more and more cunning; it will not give you wisdom. And it will make you more and more a slave; it will not give you the kingdom of God. It will make you more and more calculating, it will make you more and more exploitative. It will make you more and more political, diplomatic. You will start sucking people; that’s what people are doing.

The husband says to the wife, “I love you,” but in reality he simply uses her. The wife says she loves the husband, but she is simply using him. The husband may be using her as a sexual object and the wife may be using him as a financial security. Pleasure makes everybody cunning, deceptive. And to be cunning is to miss the bliss of being innocent, is to miss the bliss of being a child.

At Lockheed, a part was needed for a new airplane and an announcement was sent around the world to get the lowest bid. From Poland came a bid of three thousand dollars. England offered to build the part for six thousand. The asking price from Israel was nine thousand. Richardson, the engineer in charge of constructing the new plane, decided to visit each country to find the reason behind the disparity of the bids.

In Poland, the manufacturer explained, “One thousand for the materials needed, one thousand for the labor, and one thousand for overhead and a tiny profit.”

In England, Richardson inspected the part and found that it was almost as good as the Polish-made one. “Why are you asking six thousand?” inquired the engineer.
“Two thousand for material,” explained the Englishman, “two thousand for labor, and two thousand for expenses and a small profit.”

In Israel, the Lockheed representative wandered through a back alley into a small shop and encountered an elderly man who had submitted the bid of nine thousand dollars. “Why are you asking that much?” he asked.
“Well,” said the old Jew, “three thousand for you, three thousand for me, and three thousand for the schmuck in Poland!”

Money, power, prestige — they all make you cunning. Seek pleasure and you will lose your innocence; and to lose your innocence is to lose all. Jesus says: be like a small child, only then can you enter into my kingdom of God. And he is right. But the pleasure-seeker cannot be as innocent as a child. He has to be very clever, very cunning, very political; only then can he succeed in this cut-throat competition that exists all around.

Everybody is at everybody else’s throat. You are not living amongst friends. The world cannot be friendly unless we drop this idea of competitiveness. But we bring every child…. From the very beginning we start poisoning every child with this poison of competitiveness. By the time he will be coming out of the university he will be completely poisoned. We have hypnotized him with the idea that he has to fight with others, that life is a survival of the fittest. Then life can never be a celebration. Then life can never have any kind of religiousness in it. Then it cannot be pious, holy. Then it cannot have any quality of sacredness. Then it is all mean, ugly.
Buddha says: FORGO THE FIRST TO POSSESS THE SECOND.

Source – Osho Dhammapada Vol 8

Posted in Spirituality, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

ON: The 12 Archetypes

(AH – this ones for you) The term “archetypes”, as it is used in marketing today, has its origins in Carl Gustav Jung’s theories. He believed that universal, mythic characters— archetypes—reside within the collective unconscious of people the world over. Archetypal images represent fundamental human desires and evoke deep emotions.   There are 12 archetypes which symbolizes a basic human need, aspiration or motivation.

In other words, an archetype is a human type in its purest form: the classic hero, outlaw, ruler, etc. Each type has its own set of values, meanings and personality traits.

1. The Innocent Motto: Free to be you and me Core desire: to get to paradise Goal: to be happy Greatest fear: to be punished for doing something bad or wrong Strategy: to do things right Weakness: boring for all their naive innocence Talent: faith and optimism

The Innocent is also known as: Utopian, traditionalist, naive, mystic, saint, romantic, dreamer.

The Innocent provides an identity for brands that:

  • offer a simple solution to an identifiable problem are associated with goodness, morality, simplicity, nostalgia or childhood
  • are low or moderately priced are produced by a company with straightforward values need to be differentiated from brands with poor reputations.

2. The Regular Guy/Girl Motto: All men and women are created equal Core Desire: connecting with others Goal: to belong Greatest fear: to be left out or to stand out from the crowd Strategy: develop ordinary solid virtues, be down to earth, the common touch Weakness: losing one’s own self in an effort to blend in or for the sake of superficial relationships Talent: realism, empathy, lack of pretense

The Regular Person is also known as: The good old boy, everyman, the person next door, the realist, the working stiff, the solid citizen, the good neighbor, the silent majority

The Regular Person provides a good identity for brands:

  • that give people a sense of belonging
  • with an everyday functionality
  • with low to moderate prices
  • produced by a solid company with a down-home organizational culture
  • that need to be differentiated in a positive way from more elitist or higher-priced brands

Examples of Regular Person brands: IKEA

3. The Explorer Motto: Don’t fence me in Core desire: the freedom to find out who you are through exploring the world Goal: to experience a better, more authentic, more fulfilling life Biggest fear: getting trapped, conformity, and inner emptiness Strategy: journey, seeking out and experiencing new things, escape from boredom Weakness: aimless wandering, becoming a misfit Talent: autonomy, ambition, being true to one’s soul

The explorer is also known as: The seeker, iconoclast, wanderer, individualist, pilgrim.

The explorer is a good identity for brands that:

  • helps people feel free, nonconformist or pioneering
  • is rugged and sturdy or for use in the great outdoors or in dangerous settings
  • can be purchased from a catalog or on the Internet
  • helps people express their individuality
  • can be purchased for consumption on the go
  • want to differentiate themselves from a successful regular guy/gal brand or conformist brand
  • have an explorer culture that creates new and exciting products or experiences

Explorer brands would be: Virgin, Jeep, Trope-Snacks, Marlboro, Bounty.

4. The Sage Motto: The truth will set you free Core desire: to find the truth. Goal: to use intelligence and analysis to understand the world. Biggest fear: being duped, misled—or ignorance. Strategy: seeking out information and knowledge; self-reflection and understanding thought processes. Weakness: can study details forever and never act. Talent: wisdom, intelligence.

The Sage is also known as:The expert, scholar, detective, advisor, thinker, philosopher, academic, researcher, thinker, planner, professional, mentor, teacher, contemplative.

The Sage would be a good identity for brands:

  • that provide expertise or information to customers
  • that encourage customers to think
  • that are based on new scientific findings or esoteric knowledge
  • that are supported by research-based facts
  • want to differentiate themselves from others whose quality or performance is suspect

Examples of Sage Identities: CNN, Gallup, McKinsey & Co.

5. The Hero Motto: Where there’s a will, there’s a way Core desire: to prove one’s worth through courageous acts Goal: expert mastery in a way that improves the world Greatest fear: weakness, vulnerability, being a “chicken” Strategy: to be as strong and competent as possible Weakness: arrogance, always needing another battle to fight Talent: competence and courage

The Hero is also known as: The warrior, crusader, rescuer, superhero, the soldier, dragon slayer, the winner and the team player
The Hero could be good for brands:

  • that are inventions or innovations that will have a major impact on the world
  • that help people be all they can be
  • that solve a major social problem or encourage others to do so
  • that have a clear opponent you want to beat
  • that that are underdogs or challenger brands
  • that are strong and help people do tough jobs exceptionally well
  • that need to be differentiated from competitors that have problems following through or keeping their promises
  • whose customers see themselves as good, upstanding citizens

Examples of companies that express themselves like this archetype: Nike, Tag Heuer.

6. The Outlaw Motto: Rules are made to be broken Core desire: revenge or revolution Goal: to overturn what isn’t working Greatest fear: to be powerless or ineffectual Strategy: disrupt, destroy, or shock Weakness: crossing over to the dark side, crime Talent: outrageousness, radical freedom

The Outlaw is also known as: The rebel, revolutionary, wild man, the misfit, or iconoclast
The Outlaw may strengthen your brand’s identity if it:

  • has customers or employees who feel disenfranchised from society
  • helps retain values that are threatened by emerging ones, or paves the way for revolutionary new attitudes
  • is low to moderately priced
  • breaks with industry conventions

Outlaw brands include: Diesel, Harley-Davidson.

7. The Magician Motto: I make things happen. Core desire: understanding the fundamental laws of the universe Goal: to make dreams come true Greatest fear: unintended negative consequences Strategy: develop a vision and live by it Weakness: becoming manipulative Talent: finding win-win solutions

The Magician is also known as:The visionary, catalyst, inventor, charismatic leader, shaman, healer, medicine man

The Magician could be the right identity for your brand if:– the product or service is transformative

  • its implicit promise is to transform customers
  • it has a new-age quality
  • it is consciousness-expanding
  • it is user-friendly
  • has spiritual connotations
  • it is a very new, contemporary product
  • it is medium- to high-priced

Example of magical brands: Axe, Smirnoff, Polaroid, iPod.

8. The Lover Motto: You’re the only one Core desire: intimacy and experience Goal: being in a relationship with the people, work and surroundings they love Greatest fear: being alone, a wallflower, unwanted, unloved Strategy: to become more and more physically and emotionally attractive Weakness: outward-directed desire to please others at risk of losing own identity Talent: passion, gratitude, appreciation, and commitment

The Lover is also known as: The partner, friend, intimate, enthusiast, sensualist, spouse, team-builder
The Lover may be a good identity for your brand if:

  • it helps people belong, find friends or partners
  • it’s function is to help people have a good time
  • it is low to moderately priced
  • it is produced by a freewheeling, fun-loving organisational structure
  • it needs to differentiate itself from self-important, overconfident brands

Some of the great Lover brands: Alfa Romeo, Häägen-Dazs

9. The Jester Motto: You only live once Core desire: to live in the moment with full enjoyment Goal: to have a great time and lighten up the world Greatest fear: being bored or boring others Strategy: play, make jokes, be funny Weakness: frivolity, wasting time Talent: joy

The Jester is also known as: The fool, trickster, joker, practical joker or comedian

The Jester may be a good identity for brands:

  • that give people a sense of belonging
  • that help people have a good time
  • that are low or moderately priced
  • that are produced by a fun-loving company
  • that need to be differentiated from self-important, overconfident established brands

Examples of Joker brands: 7UP, Fanta

10. The Caregiver Motto: Love your neighbour as yourself Core desire: to protect and care for others Goal: to help others Greatest fear: selfishness and ingratitude Strategy: doing things for others Weakness: martyrdom and being exploited Talent: compassion, generosity

The Caregiver is also known as: The saint, altruist, parent, helper, supporter

The caregiver may be right for your brand identify if

  • it gives customers a competitive advantage
  • it supports families (products from fast-food to minivans) or is associated with nurturing (e.g. cookies, teaching materials)
  • it serves the public sector, e.g. health care, education, aid programs and other care
  • giving fields
  • helps people stay connected with and care about others
  • helps people care for themselves
  • is a non-profit or charitable cause

Examples of caregiver organizations: Volvo, Amnesty International

11. The Creator Motto: If you can imagine it, it can be done Core desire: to create things of enduring value Goal: to realize a vision Greatest fear: mediocre vision or execution Strategy: develop artistic control and skill Task: to create culture, express own vision Weakness: perfectionism, bad solutions Talent: creativity and imagination

The Creator is also known as: The artist, inventor, innovator, musician, writer or dreamer

The Creator may be right for your brand identity if:

  • it promotes self-expression, gives customers choices and options, helps foster innovation or is artistic in design
  • it is in a creative field like marketing, public relations, the arts, or technological innovation
  • you want to differentiate it from a “do-it-all” brand that leaves little room for the imagination
  • your product has a do-it-yourself aspect that saves money
  • your customer has the time to be creative
  • your organization has a creative culture

Examples of Creator brands: Lego, Sony, Swatch

12. The Ruler Motto: Power isn’t everything, it’s the only thing. Core desire: control Goal: create a prosperous, successful family or community Strategy: exercise power Greatest fear: chaos, being overthrown Weakness: being authoritarian, unable to delegate Talent: responsibility, leadership

The Ruler is also known as: The boss, leader, aristocrat, king, queen, politician, role model, manager or administrator
The Ruler may be right for your brand identity if:

  • it is a high-status product used by powerful people to enhance their power
  • it makes people more organized
  • it offers a lifetime guarantee
  • it empowers people to maintain or enhances their grip on power
  • it has a regulatory or protective function
  • is moderately to high priced
  • you want to differentiate it from more populist brands or one that is a clear leader in the field
  • it is a market leader that offers a sense of security and stability in a chaotic world

Examples of “Ruling” companies: IBM, Mercedes.

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Top 10 Qualities to Look For in a Wife

If you’re a single guy thinking about getting married, might I suggest, based on my experience, that you marry a woman who possesses the following 10 qualities?

1. So smart she constantly freaks you out with her humongous Absorb-O-Brain. Upside: Hanging around with a smart person makes you smarter. Up to a point, of course. But still. Downside: Smart people remember everything. Pretty mixed blessing.

2. So wise she makes Confucius look like Goober Pyle. Upside: Your own private oracle! Downside: Wise people are extremely good at anticipating the outcome of things that slightly less wise people do. Not entirely gratifying.

3. So perfectly matches your idea of heart-stoppingly gorgeous that just looking at her wipes every thought out of your head. Upside: Constant aesthetic revelation. Downside: It’s rude to stare.

4. So compassionate she regularly makes you feel like Ivan the Terrible. Upside: Constantly getting to see the highest aspect of human nature in action. Downside: Basically stuck having to do the right thing all the time seriously cuts into TV-watching time. Not to mention savings account.

5. So funny you can barely stand it. Upside: Never-ending yuks! Downside: Getting all the jokes means really paying attention, always. Worth it — but still.

6. An indefatigable worker. Upside: Stuff gets done. Downside: Guilt interferes with naps.

7. The greatest artist you know you’ll ever meet. Upside: (Relatively) free art! Downside: A wife who’s driven by stuff you can’t even begin to understand.

8. Shares your spiritual values. Upside: The regular achieving of deep and mutual spiritual experience simultaneously realized. Downside: None.

9. Sure that the highest human prize available in this life is a good marriage. Upside: Willing to work to achieve a great relationship. Downside: Willing to make you work to achieve a great relationship.

10. Absolutely without agenda or ambition for you beyond that you’re happy. Upside: No nagging! Ever. Downside: You have to decide what really makes you happy. Much trickier than you might think.

So remember, guys. To ensure a happy, long-lasting marriage, all you have to do is marry a woman who is smart, wise, beautiful, compassionate, funny, hard-working, aesthetically inspired, spiritual, passionately desirous of a good marriage, and has virtually no “ambitions” for you beyond that you’re happy.

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